SPEED AND HEAVY VEHICLE ACCIDENTS LEAD TO A RISE IN GUIDELINES AND SPEED LIMITING TECHNOLOGIES DESIGNED TO SAVE LIVES.

HEAVY VEHICLES AND SPEED – KEY FACTORS

According to the Australian Federal Government’s National Road Safety Strategy 2021–30, speed management is integral to safe roads, safe vehicles, and safe road use. Approximately 1200 people die on Australian roads every year, 3000 people are severely injured, and 40,000 are hospitalised.

  1. Around 18% of all road crash deaths – 210 in 2019 – involve a heavy vehicle (Source). Buses represent only a very small proportion of these deaths.
  2. Approximately 500 heavy truck occupants are hospitalised from road crashes each year — 30 % are categorised with High-threat-to-life injuries. (Source).
  3. Heavy vehicle crashes, regardless of fault, are more likely to result in a death or serious injury, due to the size and kinetic force of the vehicle.

STEPS TO MANAGING SPEED AND SAVING LIVES

The Australian Government Office of Road Safety has outlined 5 key measures to save lives when it comes to speed management, one of these being: “Vehicle technologies to support compliance and limit speeding”.

They have also recommended 9 crash avoidance and harm minimising technologies, two of these being:

  1. Autonomous Emergency Braking;
  2. And an enhanced driver’s field of view through the introduction of blind spot information systems.

SGESCO-MAX HAS PROVEN SOLUTIONS IN THESE AREAS.  SEE BELOW.

VULNERABLE ROAD USERS AND SPEED

  • Of the 1,136 people killed in road crashes in 2018, 178 were pedestrians (16%).
  • More than 1 in 10 pedestrian deaths involves a HEAVY VEHICLE.
  • The majority of all pedestrian deaths occur in 50–60 km/h zones.
  • Over the last decade, fatalities of bike riders have increased by around 45%.
  • In 2019, 34.4% of all road related deaths were Vulnerable Road Users (410 people)
  • The probability of death or serious injury for pedestrians and cyclists in a crash increases exponentially with increasing vehicle speed.

The probability of death or serious injury for pedestrians and cyclists in a crash increases exponentially with increasing vehicle speed. There is a 10% probability of being killed if they are struck at 30 km/h, and a probability of over 90% of being killed at 50 km/h, the general urban speed limit.

Source: Jurewicz, Sobhani et al (2015) and based on Wramborg (2005).